Researchers Hack Air-Gapped Computer With Simple Cell Phone

Skip Article Header. Skip to: Start of Article. The most sensitive work environments, like nuclear power plants, demand the strictest security. Usually this is achieved by air-gapping computers from the Internet and preventing workers from inserting USB sticks into computers. via Pocket http://ift.tt/1GUadjc

Summer…ah, sweet summer…

…or a hot mess. I can’t decide. 

But it’s not due to anything going on in my life. Rather, it’s due to the flaming ball of burning gas in the sky.

Is it just me, or does the sun feel hotter these days? Maybe it’s just me. I do have that teensy little condition known as fibromyalgia, after all, and it’s possible that the neuralgia has gotten worse over the past couple years. I should go see my osteopath. She’s awesome, but I hate going to the doctor. 

I think it’s because I was such a sickly child, with chronic tonsillitis that was my body’s default response to any virus it came in contact with. Between being unable to swallow and a fever that always wanted to settle at 102°F, I was miserable every six weeks from age 10 until 35. Each time, I’d dutifully head to the doctor to get a throat swab to rule out strep throat.

As far as I recall, I’ve never had strep throat. Possibly once, when I was very young, and my parents were sticklers about completing the round of medication. All the other times the culture came back, “nonspecific tonsillitis”.

It’s still shocking to me how many times I was prescribed antibiotics in spite of the fact they’d do me zero good. Let that sink in for a moment.

Most of the time this was happening at various free or drop-in clinics when I lacked health insurance. These well-meaning, too-busy health professionals would hand me a ‘script or bottle of pills with instructions. I’d look at them and ask why I should take them if I had a virus. I usually got exasperation of some kind, with an eye roll and an explanation that it would help prevent a “secondary infection”. 

I always waited for the throat culture to come back positive before taking a single pill. It never did. Such a waste of medication.

I’ve come to feel that the medical community in this country is seriously lacking. It’s too often about saving time, saving money, and maximizing profits. The pressure on the actual providers is unreal. Money-focused health care negatively impacts progress and advancement. This all goes back to Aesthetic Radicalism, of course: if we do things only for the money, we steal from our own future.

It’s a vicious circle.

Little House on The Prairie, Ch. 19: Mr. Edwards Meets Santa Claus

It’s nearly Christmas and the weather looks unpromising for Santa’s arrival. Mr. Edwards has a chance encounter that changes the holiday for everyone.

[Note: I apologize I’ve been so long in adding a new episode. I have a huge backlog of recordings I’m trying to get through. I hope everyone is having a wonderful year.]

This book was the basis for the popular television show by the same name.

There are themes in the book that describe attitudes that would be considered backward and racist today. It is not the intention to either highlight or censor these, but to let them stand as they are in the book, as a record of historical interest.

Little House on the Prairie (book) on Wikipediahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_House_on_the_Prairie#Little_House_on_the_Prairie

Laura Ingalls Wilderhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Ingalls_Wilder

The Homestead Act of 1852: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifest_destiny#Homestead_Act

The Simple Holiday

Today is Christmas, a holiday I happen to celebrate. It’s just me and The Child Person this year, so we’re keeping it simple.

Yesterday, I made some simple biscuits from a recipe I found online. It called for butter and margarine, which I never have around, so I substituted vegetable oil for the margarine, and they came out great. I think I’ll bump up the baking powder a tad next time I make them.

There were a few extra, so we left them for Santa, along with a glass of milk. He has to keep his strength up, after all.

We picked up our Holiday Feast at the grocery store a couple of days ago. To start, we’ll have a sourdough baguette with olive oil and balsamic vinegar (although I prefer oil and salt, myself). I’m baking two, beautiful russet potatoes, braising two, huge artichokes, and to round out the meal, we will have some top sirloin, broiled to a medium rare. For something sweet afterward, I’ll mix up a small batch of homemade egg nog. It’s surprisingly simple and much more yummy than store-bought.

We plan to feast on Netflix, as well. Any recommendations?

Our tree is a tiny, tabletop one we picked up at Safeway. When the Season is finished, we plan to place it somewhere else in the house, as it will pass nicely for a houseplant.

If this all seems too plain, unstructured and just not “Christmasy” enough for you, well, sue me. I like it. We did visit Christmas In The Park on Tuesday, and spent a good, long while there. I saw that there wasn’t a glass blowing demonstration…there used to be and it always fascinated me.

When it comes to holidays, I like the lack of fuss. I don’t find fuss energizing, I find it stressful. Not only does it not get me in the “spirit”, it makes me wish to skip the whole thing.

I like the quiet. I like the simplicity.

It’s Christmas. It’s cold, but sunny. There are quail that run around outside, and every once in a while they startle, and I can hear an army of little wings beating a hasty retreat.

Merry Christmas, wherever you are, and however you choose to (or not to) celebrate.

Things I Learned About People from Comic Books

I’m specifically talking about super hero comics.

These books are fun, because the writing speaks to something in everyone, either a reality that one deals with, or a fantasy, wish or dream. That said, they’ve become a solid resource for learning about humanity.

You could make a study of human nature based on the story lines in some of the most popular comics of all time. I’ve taken the time to research and still the most potent lessons for you here:

1. Everyone Has a Secret

From Clark Kent to Green Arrow, you have to hide your real self. If you want to talk about broader secrets, there are secret plans, secret pasts and secret intentions.

2. There are Good Guys and Bad Guys

Good and evil are totally clear-cut. You can always tell when someone is out to take what they can [cough*Wall Street*cough] and who’s in it to be noble and brave.

3. Sometimes Good Guys are Bad Guys and Visa Versa

Obviously, good and evil are shades of grey and a matter of perspective. OBVI!

4. Everyone Looks Great in Tights

They keep you warm in winter and cool in summer, plus they’re incredibly slimming. Also great if you wear clothes without pockets.

5. Tacky Dialogue is Cool

Remember the old Batman TV show? Well, they were tongue-in-cheek. Most shows today aren’t but they still rock.

They do rock, right?

Little House on The Prairie, Ch. 18: The Tall Indian

A tall Indian comes to the house, and Jack gets himself into a precarious situation.

This book was the basis for the popular television show by the same name.

There are themes in the book that describe attitudes that would be considered backward and racist today. It is not the intention to either highlight or censor these, but to let them stand as they are in the book, as a record of historical interest.

Little House on the Prairie (book) on Wikipediahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_House_on_the_Prairie#Little_House_on_the_Prairie

Laura Ingalls Wilderhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Ingalls_Wilder

The Homestead Act of 1852: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifest_destiny#Homestead_Act

 

Little House on The Prairie, Ch. 17: Pa Goes to Town

(I was fighting a cold when I read this, so please forgive my gravelly voice. )

Pa takes a trip to town while Ma and the girls fend for themselves during his absence. Mr. Edwards comes to help with the chores, but this upsets Jack, who gives Mr. Edwards a fright.

This book was the basis for the popular television show by the same name.

There are themes in the book that describe attitudes that would be considered backward and racist today. It is not the intention to either highlight or censor these, but to let them stand as they are in the book, as a record of historical interest.

Little House on the Prairie (book) on Wikipediahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_House_on_the_Prairie#Little_House_on_the_Prairie

Laura Ingalls Wilderhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Ingalls_Wilder

The Homestead Act of 1852: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifest_destiny#Homestead_Act

 

This is only a test

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You will be graded but the grade is meaningless in the grand scheme of things.

You will seldom be aware of the grand scheme of things.

You will always have less than you want but more than you need.

You will be dissatisfied. This feeling will drive you forward to what your peers refer to as success. It will be an unobtainable carrot.

When at the end of life you will look back and wish you had relaxed more.

Let's make magic.

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